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Social Sciences

COURSES

45 contact hrs, 3 credits

The course examines the history of southern Italian organized crime syndicates from their origins to the present day. It also focuses on how these mafias work and have succeeded, on their activities as well as on modern-day approaches to combating the criminal presence in Italy, including the reaction of civil society organizations.

Attention is paid to examples of Mafia enterprises, its past and present role in politics, and its evolution from a regional organization to one with an international reach. A research project, with both a paper and an oral presentation, is required in addition to two written exams.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • discuss the historical origins of the Mafia;
  • describe how the Mafia works and the tactics it has used to succeed;
  • discuss past and present Mafia enterprises;
  • describe the role the Mafia has and does play in Italian politics;
  • critically examine the different approaches used to combat the Mafia;
  • describe the evolution of the Mafia from an organization that was regional in scope to one today that has international reach;
  • employ basic research techniques to locate, evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of sources

45 contact hours, 3 credits

Course Description:

In this course, you will examine how people meet each other and how they communicate, how they interact and create connections, and how these encounters can be a source of creative change. This course will focus on the impact of experiencing different cultures and becoming aware of your own fears, which can be an obstacle in creating relations and can force you back to your own comfort zone. Through this course, you will come away with an increased awareness of common and important patterned social and cultural differences. Additionally, this course will provide you a space to reflect on your own personal experience with cultural difference and it will encourage you to engage with different cultures in a hands-on, meaningful way to mindfully experience cross-cultural communication everywhere you go, but most notably, here on your Sorrento study abroad.

45 contact hours, 3 credits

Course Description:

In this course, you will examine Italian history, beginning with the end of World War II and the birth of the Italian Republic. You will study the clashes between various political parties, the Cold War, the economic boom, and terrorism in the 1970s. Later, you will examine the political degeneration of the 80s, “Tangentopoli,” and the new political system in the Berlusconi era. This course will pay particular attention to foreign policy, focusing on Italy’s role in the international arena with an emphasis on the European unification process with Italy as a leading country. Your professor will generate a critical discussion on these topics, inviting you to think independently about the causes and consequences of the events that you study. You are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. You will be evaluated by two written exams and one 5-page research paper.

45 contact hours, 3 credits

Course Description:

The course aims to understand the concept of sustainability on its theoretical evolution and its nowadays practical implementation in EU, Italy as well as other parts of the world. Therefore the course will analyze the relationship between economy, environment and society in the era of globalization. It will also focus on the European Union and other case studies around the world. The course will focus on different concepts such as renewable resource, circular economy, corporate social responsibility and it will focus of some particular subjects such as the food industry, waste management, energy, etc. In particular, students will study theories and practices of sustainability and will be able to answer the following questions:
? How sustainability is implemented in different parts of the world? Is it successful?
? Is it possible to consider sustainability the future mainstream economic model?
? How can how we can introduce sustainability in our communities of reference?
? What role should law-makers, governments, enterprises and consumers play for this change?

45 contact hours, 3 credits

In this course, you will examine the history, development, structure, and efficacy of international human rights law. You will investigate the legal framework of the United Nations and regional systems relating to the promotion of, among other things, the rights of minorities and indigenous peoples, women’s rights, the rights of migrants and refugees, cultural rights, and the emerging field of environmental rights. You will assess existing remedies for violations of human rights law in various systems and you will examine practical case studies where relevant.

Through taking this course, you will be able to:

Compare the international human rights law system and regional human rights law system;

Evaluate the various mechanisms and procedures for human rights law enforcement;

Critically assess specific areas of international human rights law with reference to relevant legal instruments and contemporary cases;

Acquire basic competency in legal writing and research.

45 contact hours, 3 credits

Course Description:

In this course, you will examine energy in international relations. First, you will learn the energy fundamentals, including the historical overview of energy, different energy sources and their characteristics, and the supply and demand of energy. Next, you will focus on energy security as a key perspective in the study of energy and geopolitics. Then, you will study the link between energy, development, and the environment. Additionally, you will examine a range of energy scenarios developed by distinct international and research institutions.

45 contact hours, 3 credits

In this interdisciplinary course, you will be introduced to the theories and methods used in gender studies. Through the examination of a variety of topics, you will explore the ways that gender shapes societies and cultures historically and throughout the world.

Through this course, you will be able to:

Demonstrate creative thinking by linking content and insights from multiple disciplines;

Communication through written, oral, and/or visual media in a manner appropriate to the audience and occasion, with a clear message in an organized structure;

Demonstrate awareness of societal and/or civic issues;

Understand and practice academic honesty;

Demonstrate knowledge of the interconnectedness of global dynamics (issues, processes, trends, and systems).

45 hrs, 3 credits

This course provides an introduction to the political, intellectual, cultural, and economic features of Western civilization from the early modern period to the mid-twentieth century. The topics covered will include the roots of Western Civilization, Enlightenment, French Revolution and Napoleon, Industrial Revolution, Liberalism, Romanticism, Nationalism, Socialism, Imperialism, the First World War, Totalitarianism, World War II, post-War Europe, the rise of Western feminism, post modernism and the current communications revolution, and globalization trends.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

  • define western civilization, explain the development of its major elements, situate it in a global context;
  • evaluate the influence of social, intellectual, and political movements and the impact of wars and revolutions;
  • demonstrate the causal and interrelated nature of events and compare and contrast people and events of various periods.

45 hrs, 3 credits

This course will examine cultural diversity in contemporary Europe as the continent struggles to compete in an evolving global environment. Students will explore many different aspects of Europe today including issues relating to the development of the European Union and to gender, migration, religion, nationalism, crime, food and social innovation.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to do the following:

1. Discuss the values of and challenges faced by the European Union today.
2. Describe the power of organized crime and its impact on European governance.
3. Identify the main gender issues facing the continent today and discuss possible remedies.
4. Describe the history and goals of European nationalist organizations extant today.
5. Analyze the role of religion in today’s Europe.
6. Discuss past and present patterns of migration to and from Europe.
7. Discuss how social innovation is changing European economies and societies.
8. Describe both the cultural and the economic meaning of food in Europe today.

45 hrs, 3 credits

The goal of this course is to offer a wide introduction to the main evolution of the Mediterranean, using not just history but its cultures, religions and peoples as well. The main topics covered are: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Greece, Rome, Germanics, Byzantines, the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, the Renaissance, the different Mediterranean families and the Modernization of the Mediterranean Societies. These topics will not be covered chronologically but by item. Although each lecture will maintain a chronological structure. At the end of each module, students will be invited to prepare and present oral presentations covering one of the topics of the module.

At the end of the course, students will write a 15-page essay concerning one of the topics studied during the course.

3 credits

This course is an introduction to the field of International Relations. The first module of the course will present the major theoretical frameworks developed and employed to analyze of world politics. Thinking in terms of theory is the only way to ponder over international dynamics and processes in an informed and proper way.

The second part of the course will refer to those theories in order to make sense and discuss some of the major themes currently pertaining to world politics: international security, globalization, transnational terrorism, human rights, with a strong focus on development cooperation and the issues related to migrants/refugees (module C).

45 contact hrs, 3 credits

The aim of this course is to read Italian and European literary texts of the 20th century, by both male and female writers, from a feminist perspective. Our starting point will be the following definition of the “feminist reader”: The feminist reader assumes that there is no innocent or neutral approach to literature and that all interpretation is political. The feminist reader might ask, among other questions, how the text represents men and women, what it says about gender relations, how it defines sexual difference. A feminist does not necessarily read in order to praise or to blame, to judge or to censor. More commonly she sets out to assess how the text invites its readers, as members of a specific culture, to understand what it means to be a woman or a man, and so encourages them to reaffirm or to challenge existing cultural norms

45 contact hrs, 3 credits

This course surveys cultural relations between Italy and the United States from the end on 19th century to the present. Rather than just comparing historical events we will place them in juxtaposition focusing on unexpected and critical connections. We will embark on a transatlantic journey tracing multiple histories that connect past and present, global and local: Migration, sounds, moving images, international relations and politics, radicalism, race and racialism, the American Century, the truly global aspect of World War II, organized crime, the urban crises of the 1970s, global media flows, power and mass communication, youth culture, and imperialism

COURSE HIGHLIGHT

SPECIAL TOPICS: HISTORY OF THE MAFIA

HIST 350

Professor Fabrizio Novellino, Ph.D.

The course examines the history of southern Italian organized crime syndicates from their origins to the present day. It also focuses on how these mafias work and have succeeded, on their activities as well as on modern-day approaches to combating the criminal presence in Italy, including the reaction of civil society organizations.

Attention is paid to examples of Mafia enterprises, its past and present role in politics, and its evolution from a regional organization to one with an international reach. A research project, with both a paper and an oral presentation, is required in addition to two written exams.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student will be able to:

Discuss the historical origins of the Mafia;

Describe how the Mafia works and the tactics it has used to succeed;

Discuss past and present Mafia enterprises;

Describe the role the Mafia has and does play in Italian politics;

Critically examine the different approaches used to combat the Mafia;

Describe the evolution of the Mafia from an organization that was regional in scope to one today that has international reach;

Employ basic research techniques to locate, evaluate and synthesize information from a variety of sources

INTERNSHIP POSITIONS AVAILABLE:

“Growing up in the United States you learn bits and pieces about the mafia. You are taught that the mafia is a Southern Italy born group that expanded into New York. When I found out I was able to learn the truth of the Mafia I was extremely excited. Going to Naples and being able to see the literal streets and buildings that started it all was a once in a lifetime experience. My favorite part of the trip was being able to see the city block that started one of the biggest clans. Knowing that even after building up a clan and having money to move they decided to stay in that city block is very intriguing. I think it shows that even though they were people who committed very violent crimes they still cared deeply about their families and home roots.Overall, I found this trip to be an eye-opening experience, being able to see these things in such a difficult time is amazing. I am extremely happy that I was able to learn the truth behind the Mafia through the city of Naples.”

– Campbell Wood, Florida Gulf Coast University

Our Mission

Sant'Anna's mission is to educate, support, and inspire international students to become active citizens of the world. We are committed to academic excellence within an authentic and engaging Italian community.

Discover Sant'Anna

Mission and Goals

At Sant’Anna we strive to provide students from across the world a unique, hands-on learning experience where they can cultivate real world skills and knowledge.

Because the school is located in Sorrento, one of the most harmonious cities southern Italy has to offer, our students are truly able to gain a global awareness and appreciate diversity while studying abroad. Our goal is to help guide participating students into becoming responsible, open-minded members of society.

Our hope is that each student can leave Sant’Anna with an appreciation of the Italian culture as well as the knowledge acquired through their academic courses.

We are so passionate about the importance of international education and training in a student’s academic career, and we are dedicated to doing whatever it takes to providing students with a life changing experience.

Our Values
Value for the characteristics that make others different from ourselves, including but not restricted to: race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, culture. Granting equal opportunities and fostering an inclusive environment is of the upmost importance to our organization.
Value for the exploration of different ways in which we can better serve our staff, students, and community.
Value for our students to use their experience away from home to explore and learn from the unfamiliar.
Value for the differences that make our community strong. We strive to understand and appreciate that which is different from ourselves.
Value for a holistic learning approach.
Value for the global reach within which our organization operates. We celebrate the culture and variety brought by our students to our institute.
Value for the pursuit and exploration of knowledge.
Value for the empowerment of our staff and students to facilitate change.
Value for the ability to grow from every experience both in and out of the classroom.
Value for staff and students to feel capable and independent in their daily lives.
Value for socially and environmentally progressive practices that protect our environment.

Mediterranean Location

Our Location
Why choose Sorrento?

Study abroad programs in Italy have traditionally focused on the popular cultural centers of Rome, Florence, Milan, and other cities in the north of Italy. At Sant’Anna Institute, study abroad students have the opportunity to experience the unique culture, customs, and climate of southern Italy.

Sant’Anna is located in the stunning town of Sorrento at the beginning of the Amalfi Coast, just 20 miles south of Naples. Perched atop hundred foot cliffs that face the Gulf of Naples, Sorrento is within sight of rugged snow-capped mountains, emerald waters, black sand beaches, cliff- hanging villages, and the world’s best known volcano: Vesuvius.

Sorrento is a safe, walkable, and picturesque center of international tourism. It has an international population, making it a small town, with a cosmopolitan feel.

Sorrento also boasts:

  • Friendly, gracious people
  • Southern hospitality
  • Italian style
  • Bustling shopping streets and traditional Roman-style alleys
  • A mild, sun-drenched Mediterranean climate
  • Culinary traditions based on the seafood, and locally grown, fresh produce
  • Streets lined with lemon and orange trees
  • Hillsides covered with olive groves and vineyards
  • Home to some of the best pizza and gelato you will find anywhere

Sorrento is a treasure all its own and a passageway to the:

  • tunning islands of Capri and Ischia
  • baroque splendor of Naples
  • majestic Greek temples at Paestum
  • historic Roman ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum
  • world-famous collection at the National Archaeological Museum in Naples
  • cliff hanging villages of the Amalfi Coast, like Positano, Amalfi and Ravello
  • world’s best known volcano, Mount Vesuvius

It’s the perfect city to discover a home away from home with a hometown feel!

Sant’Anna Institute is located overlooking the Marina Grande of Sorrento, perched on the cliffside with stunning views from the sea-facing windows, and it’s a short walk to the harbor and the harbor-side restaurants.

The Institute is located a short 15-minute walk from the center of town and 20 minutes from the Sorrento train and bus station.

The Residence Hall was established in 2017 and is on the third and fourth floors of the Institute, overlooking the picturesque Marina Grande.